The Most Surprisingly Effective Way to Judge a Potential Employer

BMoe (Brad Moore)
3 min readMay 31, 2022

I discovered it by accident, and I should have turned around and left before the interview even started.

Photo by Gabor Monori on Unsplash

Early in my career I was changing jobs usually more often than every 2 years. I went through a record-breaking run of 5 or 6 employers in a row which went belly-up in the 90’s, and at other times a job change was the way to get a raise or promotion.

The more things change…

I had taken a job at a small “Computer Shopper” mail-order shop, but that only lasted about three months. I wish I had known this trick back then.

I drove to Greeley for my interview. I had no intention of working in Greeley, but was eventually hired to stand up a new location in Denver (from a networking/IT standpoint).

Upon arriving at the HQ in Greeley I made a quick trip to the men’s room. As I came around the corner in this warehouse-like facility, there was flooding coming out of the restroom, and workers were being told to go over to the ladies room across the floor. A manager was put in charge of monitoring who went in and out, so as to help maintain privacy.

Photo by Drew Harbour on Unsplash

When myturn finally came, I realized that this bathroom may have been drier than the flooded men’s room, but it was otherwise not in better shape.

Relieved (or “having relieved myself”), and slightly disgusted, I left the warehouse floor and went to my interview.

My follow-up meeting was at the Denver location and was a big improvement.

Photo by Drew Harbour on Unsplash

That is not a compliment.

I took the job, because I needed it. I know, that never happens. As the Denver facility grew, the bathroom situation stabilized.

I didn’t say “improved”, I said, “stabilized.”

From my first interview until the day I left, this company (which WOW, they are still in business! Imagine my shock) showed me two critical things:

  • A company’s bathroom reveals what the employees think of their employer, and
  • A company’s bathroom reveals what the employer thinks of their workforce.

As strange as it sounds, in the almost 30 years since that day, I now make it a habit of visiting the men’s room before interviewing. At first it was just curiosity, but as patterns arose validating my initial assumption, I began making it a qualifying component for accepting a job with any company.

Now, run down to your bathroom. What does your employer think of you?

Working from home? What do you think of your employer?

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BMoe (Brad Moore)

Crappy writer with good information. I’m here to inform and protect through better management and improved technology